Brendan Brady reports on politics, human rights, business, religion, culture and environmental issues in Asia and the Pacific. He works in print, video, photography and radio.
Posts tagged "Media"
Amid Rising Dissent, Vietnam Cracks Down on Bloggers

Amid Rising Dissent, Vietnam Cracks Down on Bloggers

Faced with economic trouble, infighting and unprecedented public criticism, Vietnam’s ruling Communist Party is cracking down on dissent. Forty-six bloggers or activists have been sentenced to jail so far this year.
Myanmar: A New Layout

Myanmar: A New Layout

For decades, a clique of generals cast themselves as Myanmar’s guardians, and treated any who questioned their policies as enemies of the state. Veteran journalist Maung Wuntha, founder of The People’s Age, a political weekly journal, was repeatedly jailed for airing grievances against the ruling junta. Today, after a sweeping series of democratic reforms, he...
Reporting in Burma

Reporting in Burma

After decades of being one of the most oppressive and isolated countries in the world, Myanmar has abruptly changed course. On the occasion of elections in April that saw opposition candidate Aung San Suu Kyi elected, a veteran Burmese journalist discussed his country’s reform and changing journalistic landscape.
Burma's Media Speaks Out

Burma’s Media Speaks Out

Greater tolerance for free speech is among the most tangible signs of the Southeast Asian country’s dramatic reform. Since a power handover last year from a military dictatorship to a quasi-civilian government, Burma’s new regime has surprised people in and outside the country by giving substance to the structural change: hundreds of political prisoners were...
Burma Soldier Speaks Out

Burma Soldier Speaks Out

The documentary film Burma Soldier examines the question of what drives an otherwise ordinary person to join up with a brutal institution—and what gives him the courage to risk his life and change course.
Foreign Correspondents of Cambodia Civil War Hold Bittersweet Reunion

Foreign Correspondents of Cambodia Civil War Hold Bittersweet Reunion

Journalists gather in Phnom Penh 35 years after the conflict to remember their wild nights and fallen comrades. The front lines in Cambodia’s war were even more vague than in Vietnam, the rules of engagement less defined, and there were no U.S. helicopters to extract distressed reporters from harm's way.
Lights, Camera, Genocide!

Lights, Camera, Genocide!

A new TV show is rapidly extending the reach of the Khmer Rouge war crimes court to Cambodian households. Every Monday afternoon, along with fellow Cambodian journalist, Ung Chan Sophea, host Neth Pheaktra provides a sober summary and analysis of court testimony and the legal framework in which it is heard.