Brendan Brady reports on politics, human rights, business, religion, culture and environmental issues in Asia and the Pacific. He works in print, video, photography and radio.
Posts tagged "Myanmar"
Burma’s Rohingya Muslims Targeted by Buddhist Mob Violence

Burma’s Rohingya Muslims Targeted by Buddhist Mob Violence

The conflict in western Burma’s Rakhine State erupted last June, when reports spread that a Buddhist woman was raped and murdered by three Rohingya men. Shortly after, a mob of Buddhists exacted retribution by pulling over a bus carrying Muslims and beating 10 passengers to death. The incidents ignited sectarian violence throughout the state. ...
The Ancient Burmese City of Bagan Struggles for International Recognition

The Ancient Burmese City of Bagan Struggles for International Recognition

Though Bagan is less famous than Cambodia’s Angkor Wat, Egypt’s Luxor or Peru’s Machu Picchu, its historical treasures are no less impressive. Some 3,000 temples, monasteries and pagodas stretch across a 26-square-mile plain. The country’s recent rulers have been keen to make their mark on it. Their so-called beautification projects have been controversial, though.
Yangon in Color

Yangon in Color

Economic Growth Could Imperil Yangon's Colonial-Era Buildings

Economic Growth Could Imperil Yangon’s Colonial-Era Buildings

Myanmar is emerging from decades of repression and international isolation. The one-time military government has enacted democratic reforms, and the U.S. and others have responded by suspending sanctions. Now the country is viewed as a promising frontier economy. A rush of foreign investment could rejuvenate the main city, Yangon. But preservationists worry it could also...
Boom Days in Burma

Boom Days in Burma

For decades, Burma was distinguished for its ruling junta’s imprisonment and torture of political dissidents, execution of protesters, violent campaigns against ethnic minorities, and other abuses that made the country a byword for bloody dictatorship. Today, after little more than a year of democratic reform, the dominant description of Burma has changed in many circles...
Myanmar: Awaiting Change

Myanmar: Awaiting Change

Myanmar is experiencing a transition from military to semi-civilian rule. Its new government has released hundreds of political prisoners and relaxed controls on political association, civil society and the press. But for most of Myanmar’s people, who are among the poorest in Asia, reform has yet to improve basic services such as healthcare.
As Rangoon Races Forward, a Push to Preserve Its Architectural Past

As Rangoon Races Forward, a Push to Preserve Its Architectural Past

Decades of economic stasis has helped preserve the core of what is today the largest collection of late 19th century and early 20th century urban architecture anywhere in Southeast Asia. The reopening of Rangoon promises much-needed renewal but, conservationists worry, could hasten the destruction of these remarkable structures.
Myanmar: A New Layout

Myanmar: A New Layout

For decades, a clique of generals cast themselves as Myanmar’s guardians, and treated any who questioned their policies as enemies of the state. Veteran journalist Maung Wuntha, founder of The People’s Age, a political weekly journal, was repeatedly jailed for airing grievances against the ruling junta. Today, after a sweeping series of democratic reforms, he...
Reporting in Burma

Reporting in Burma

After decades of being one of the most oppressive and isolated countries in the world, Myanmar has abruptly changed course. On the occasion of elections in April that saw opposition candidate Aung San Suu Kyi elected, a veteran Burmese journalist discussed his country’s reform and changing journalistic landscape.
Burma's Media Speaks Out

Burma’s Media Speaks Out

Greater tolerance for free speech is among the most tangible signs of the Southeast Asian country’s dramatic reform. Since a power handover last year from a military dictatorship to a quasi-civilian government, Burma’s new regime has surprised people in and outside the country by giving substance to the structural change: hundreds of political prisoners were...
Yangon's Historic Structures

Yangon’s Historic Structures

Strike a Pose in Myanmar

Strike a Pose in Myanmar

Burma: Democracy on the Edge

Burma: Democracy on the Edge

For decades Burma’s people have been caught in the iron grip of a military dictatorship that stamped out any whiff of dissent and sealed off the country from outside scrutiny. Today, as the country experiences a dramatic, if still qualified, democratic opening, figures previously deemed subversive are now finding a protected place in the public...
By-elections in Burma

By-elections in Burma

Burma’s transition away from military rule continues

Burma’s transition away from military rule continues

The size and furious energy of the crowd were startling sights in Burma, where stultifying and violent military rule has long suppressed public expressions of support for figures outside the ruling clique.
Burma Soldier Speaks Out

Burma Soldier Speaks Out

The documentary film Burma Soldier examines the question of what drives an otherwise ordinary person to join up with a brutal institution—and what gives him the courage to risk his life and change course.
Burma's Vote: A Wardrobe Change?

Burma’s Vote: A Wardrobe Change?

Ahead of Burma’s November 7 election, Thailand’s foreign minister raised alarms in the camps holding some 150,000 Burmese refugees when he remarked it would soon be time for them to be repatriated back to the country they fled. Critics say the upcoming election in Burma is a ploy by the junta to legitimize its power...
Burmese Exiles Find Refuge in Thailand -- But for How Long?

Burmese Exiles Find Refuge in Thailand — But for How Long?

Mae Sot has absorbed a colorful mosaic of migrants and anti-government exiles of various stripes from its military-ruled neighbor to the west. Walk through one of the town's main markets and you'll catch vignettes of life across the border.
Welcome Withdrawn

Welcome Withdrawn

Thailand's foreign ministry says Burmese asylum seekers will not be returned until “the situation in their country becomes conducive.” But Thai authorities have shown an inclination in recent years to carry out deportations even in the face of strong opposition from rights groups and foreign powers.