Brendan Brady reports on politics, human rights, business, religion, culture and environmental issues in Asia and the Pacific. He works in print, video, photography and radio.
Posts tagged "Politics"
Letter from Sri Lanka: The Empty Chair

Letter from Sri Lanka: The Empty Chair

The Sri Lankan government says it freed Tamil civilians from the clutches of a terrorist movement. Human rights groups say the state army perpetrated war crimes, and has since ruled punitively over the north.
Reporting in Burma

Reporting in Burma

After decades of being one of the most oppressive and isolated countries in the world, Myanmar has abruptly changed course. On the occasion of elections in April that saw opposition candidate Aung San Suu Kyi elected, a veteran Burmese journalist discussed his country’s reform and changing journalistic landscape.
By-elections in Burma

By-elections in Burma

Burma’s transition away from military rule continues

Burma’s transition away from military rule continues

The size and furious energy of the crowd were startling sights in Burma, where stultifying and violent military rule has long suppressed public expressions of support for figures outside the ruling clique.
President Jose Ramos-Horta

President Jose Ramos-Horta

The following roughly recorded tracks are parts of an interview with Timor-Leste's president, Jose Ramos-Horta, the day before the first round of elections. He has not been reelected.
East Timor Presidential Poll

East Timor Presidential Poll

Language, Politics and Indentity in East Timor

Language, Politics and Indentity in East Timor

East Timor's resistance leaders were educated in Portuguese and promoted it as the language of the resistance to underline the historical and cultural differences between the island nation and Indonesia as well as to avoid infighting. Today, many of the practical consequences of the Portuguese language's prominent status in East Timor remain troublesome.
Mekong: Rising Tide

Mekong: Rising Tide

Hydropower dams slated for the Mekong pit electricity rewards against the river's tremendous but vulnerable ecosystem, leaving the mighty river's fate in question.
East Timor: Observers Divided Over Oil Fund Investment

East Timor: Observers Divided Over Oil Fund Investment

A new bill allowing more diversified investments by Timor-Leste's multi-billion dollar oil and natural gas sovereign fund, which underwrites the lion's share of the country's expenditure, has divided opinion, with some saying the step is necessary to maintain current levels of development spending and others calling the move risky.
Deadly Clashes as Thai-Cambodian Temple Tensions Reignite

Deadly Clashes as Thai-Cambodian Temple Tensions Reignite

Cambodian and Thai troops squared-off for the fourth consecutive day on Monday, the latest in a series of deadly clashes over small but symbolically valued sections of territory along the Southeast Asian countries' shared border.
The Disappeared: No Peace for Victims of Nepal's Civil War

The Disappeared: No Peace for Victims of Nepal’s Civil War

While visiting home in 2002, Rajendra Tharu awoke in his parent's house surrounded by childhood classmates. They had not come to welcome him back. Since finishing school, Tharu had joined the police; the others, from the same farming village in Bardiya, had become supporters of the Maoist revolutionaries fighting against the government.
The Ghosts of Nepal's Disappeared

The Ghosts of Nepal’s Disappeared

A decade-long civil war claimed thousands of lives. More than four years after it ended, though, official silence means some families can’t move on.
Nepal’s Restive Revolutionaries

Nepal’s Restive Revolutionaries

“Weapons are not powerful—powerful are those who have strong ideas and humanity,” says Budha. But, ultimately, it is as much their weapons as their populist ideology that makes the Maoists potent.
Nepal: UN Peace Mission Ends Amid Political Deadlock

Nepal: UN Peace Mission Ends Amid Political Deadlock

A UN mission established to monitor Nepal’s post-civil war transition will end on 15 January amid concerns the country’s fragile peace process could unravel. The country has functioned with only a caretaker government for more than six months, and progress on drafting a new constitution has stalled.
Nepal: Political Stalemate Threatens Foreign Aid

Nepal: Political Stalemate Threatens Foreign Aid

As the deadlock has taken its toll on the country, it has also worn away the patience of foreign donors, who continue to warn that their ability to deliver aid could soon be curtailed if the leadership vacuum continues.
Burma's Vote: A Wardrobe Change?

Burma’s Vote: A Wardrobe Change?

Ahead of Burma’s November 7 election, Thailand’s foreign minister raised alarms in the camps holding some 150,000 Burmese refugees when he remarked it would soon be time for them to be repatriated back to the country they fled. Critics say the upcoming election in Burma is a ploy by the junta to legitimize its power...
Welcome Withdrawn

Welcome Withdrawn

Thailand's foreign ministry says Burmese asylum seekers will not be returned until “the situation in their country becomes conducive.” But Thai authorities have shown an inclination in recent years to carry out deportations even in the face of strong opposition from rights groups and foreign powers.
Can a New Thailand Emerge from the Red Shirt Rubble?

Can a New Thailand Emerge from the Red Shirt Rubble?

The government of Prime Minister Abhisit managed to stamp out the protests. But the dramatic, days-long conclusion to the standoff brought no resolution to the underlying divisions between the Red Shirts and their yellow-shirted opponents.
Beijing's Moneyed Advance on Southeast Asia

Beijing’s Moneyed Advance on Southeast Asia

Cambodia hastily deported 20 ethnic Uighur asylum-seekers back to China over the strong objections of Western nations. Two days later, Beijing followed through on a planned $1.2 billion infrastructure investment in Cambodia. The two governments denied any quid pro quo.
Cambodia's One-Party Future

Cambodia’s One-Party Future

A Cambodian court on Jan. 27 sentenced the country's main opposition leader, Sam Rainsy, in absentia to two years in jail, in a closed-door trial. When and if Mr. Rainsy returns, the promise of the opposition movement appears bleaker than ever—and his leadership is partly to blame.
Deported Uighurs Highlight China's Ties to Cambodia

Deported Uighurs Highlight China’s Ties to Cambodia

Two days after Cambodia repatriated 20 Uighur asylum-seekers fleeing China, the two countries signed trade agreements worth more than $1 billion, bringing significant investment, loans and grants to the impoverished Southeast Asian nation. Both countries deny a deal was struck.
Breaking Bread with North Korea

Breaking Bread with North Korea

Access to the police state of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea may be prohibitively difficult, but in Phnom Penh, diners can sample an elaborate combination of North Korean food, culture and dance at one of its state-controlled restaurants.
Cambodia Sends Uighur Asylum-Seekers Back to China

Cambodia Sends Uighur Asylum-Seekers Back to China

Human rights workers fear the group face prison or execution in China, where nine Uighurs have been to death over July protests. Some say China's aid to the poor nation played a role in the decision.
In Cambodia, A Threatened Tribe of Islam

In Cambodia, A Threatened Tribe of Islam

On the occasion of Imam San's birthday, the sect that emerged from his early followers gathers in the former royal city of Udong to honor his memory through prayer and offerings. The colorful mawlut ceremony reaffirms the sect's privileged heritage and its continued isolation from the rest of the country's Islamic community.